A minor in music requires 20 hours consisting of four hours of Music Theory, MUS1010 and MUS1020; two hours of Sight Singing and Dictation, MUS1030 and MUS1040; two hours of Piano Proficiency, MUS1150 and MUS1160; six hours from Music History, MUS3110 (may be substituted by Music Literature, MUS2090) and MUS3120; four hours in one instrument; and two hours of Music Electives.

Minor Courses:

Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
MUS1010 Music Theory I (2)
MUS1020 Music Theory II (2)
MUS1030 Sight-Singing and Dictation I (1)
MUS1040 Sight-Singing and Dictation II (1)
MUS1150 Piano Proficiency I (1)
MUS1160 Piano Proficiency II (1)
MUS3110(May be substituted with MUS2090) Music History I(Music Literature) (3)(2)
MUS3120 Music History II (3)
Private Lessons Vocal or Instrumental (4)
Music Electives (2)

Part II: Course Descriptions

MUS 1010 Music Theory (2)
This course covers the fundamentals of music, including elements of pitch and rhythm, introduction to triads and seventh chords, diatonic chords in major and minor keys, construction and function of scale and intervals, principles of voice leading, harmonic progression, triads in first inversion, and musical form. Satisfies Fine Arts General Education requirement; theoretical-lecture credit. Offered every Fall Semester.

MUS 1020 Music Theory (2)
This course covers triads in second inversion, use of non-harmonic tones, triads, and dominant seventh chords in root position and inversions, modulation, correlated analysis, secondary dominants, basic principles of musical form, and part writing. Satisfies Fine Arts General Education requirement; theoretical-lecture credit. Prerequisite: MUS 101. Offered every Spring Semester.

MUS 1030 Sight Singing and Dictation (Level 1) (1)
This course develops the sight singing ability of the student through utilizing solfeggio syllables to sing melodic passages in all major keys in simple and compound meters. The aural skills emphasized include the identification of all diatonic intervals by sight and sound, melodic dictation in major keys, and chordal recognition of the tonic, subdominant, and dominant chords. This course will assist the student in developing skills related to music theory. The class will focus on interval recognition, sight singing, melodic dictation, rhythmic dictation, basic chordal recognition, and computer-based music learning skills. Offered every Fall Semester.

MUS 1040 Sight Singing and Dictation (Level 2) (1)
This course develops the sight singing ability of the student through utilizing solfeggio syllables to sing melodic passages in all major and minor keys in simple and compound meters. The aural skills emphasized include the identification of all diatonic intervals, melodic dictation in minor and major keys, two-part harmonic dictation, and chordal identification of the basic chords in major and minor keys. The class will focus on interval recognition, sight singing, melodic dictation, rhythmic dictation, basic chordal recognition, and computer-based music learning skills. Offered every Spring Semester.

MUS 1150 Piano Proficiency – Level I (1)
The course includes sight reading, clapping simple rhythmic patterns, folk tunes with block accompaniment, construction of major scales, recognition and explanation of time and major key signatures, and simple I-V-I progressions in major keys, including improvisation of the I-IV-I progression in all twelve keys and improvisation of simple melodies using this progression. Meets one hour weekly. For music and music education majors only. Offered every semester. Each Piano Proficiency student receiving the CO grade is given one full semester to complete course requirements and a letter grade is assigned at the end of the semester. If the student does not complete course requirements, he or she is assigned a D or F. All music majors must complete Piano Proficiency requirements by the end of the junior year. Students who do not finish are required to petition the music faculty to continue Piano Proficiency during the senior year. Those without extenuating circumstances are required to finish Piano Proficiency in summer school prior to the senior year.

MUS 1160 Piano Proficiency – Level II (1)
The course includes sight reading and clapping more complicated rhythmic patterns, folk tunes with broken chord accompaniments, minor key signatures, construction of major and minor triads, simple I-IV-V-I, major and minor triads, solid and broken, including improvisation of the I-IV-I-V7-I in all keys and improvisation of simple melodies using this progression. Meets one hour weekly. For music and music education majors only. See course description for MUS 115 for grading information. Offered every semester.

MUS 3110 Music History I (3)
This is a survey of Western music from classical Greece through early Christian chant, medieval monophony, early polyphony, Ars Nova and the Renaissance. Reading assignments are supplemented by audio and video tapes in the library. The class meets three times a week and is open to all students. Music and music education majors are expected to pass an exit exam to pass the course. Prerequisites: MUS 201, 202, and 209. Offered every Fall Semester.

MUS 3120 Music History II (3)
This is a survey of Western music from the early Baroque through eighteenth century classicism, nineteenth century romanticism and the major currents of the twentieth century. Reading assignments are supplemented by audio and videotapes in the library. The class meets three times a week and is open to all students. Music and music education majors are expected to pass an exit exam to pass the course. May be taken independently of MUS 311. Prerequisites: MUS 201, 202, and 209. Offered every Spring Semester.

MUS 2090 Music Literature (2)
This course is designed to give students a general understanding of stylistic periods of Western art music and representative composers. Through the study of this course, the student will develop an understanding of the materials of western art music including melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic tradition; the student will develop an understanding of the basic forms of the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20th Century periods, showing recognition from both score and recordings. The student will also develop facility in reading orchestral scores; the student will develop an introductory understanding of ethnomusicology, including the music of other cultures. Much outside listening is required and students are expected to pass an exit listening exam to pass the course. Music Literature is required of music and music education majors during the sophomore year. Prerequisites: MUS 101, 102, 103, and 115; ENCS 101 and 102. Non-music majors may be permitted to take the course with permission of the instructor. Offered every Fall Semester.