Part I: Requirements

Major: Bachelor of Music Education with Licensure (Instrumental)

Major Requirements:

Bachelor of Music Education

The North Carolina SDPI Music Licensure, K-12, offers a broad range within its certification. Music licensure (K-12) is offered in choral music and instrumental music at Greensboro College. Music education majors study one principal instrument which includes a band or orchestral brass or woodwind instrument, percussion, organ, piano, voice, orchestral string instrument and guitar. Students may elect to study a second principal instrument. Music education majors are required to participate in at least five semesters of a large ensemble pertaining to their principal applied study (Marching/Concert Band, Chorale) and at least three semesters of a small ensemble as recommended by their principal applied teacher.

These programs prepare students for licensure in public school music while enabling them to achievea high level of professional competence in their chosen fields as well as preparing them for entranceinto graduate study.

Major courses: Basic Musicianship and Performance

Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
MUS1010 Music Theory I (2)
MUS1020 Music Theory II (2)
MUS1030 Sight-Singing and Dictation (1)
MUS1040 Sight-Singing and Dictation (1)
MUS1150 Piano Proficiency I (1)
MUS1160 Piano Proficiency II (1)
MUS2010 Advanced Music Theory III (2)
MUS2020 Advanced Music Theory IV (2)
MUS2030 Advanced Sight Singing and Dictation (1)
MUS2040 Advanced Sight Singing and Dictation (1)
MUS2090 Music Literature (2)
MUS2150 Piano Proficiency III (1)
MUS2160 Piano Proficiency IV (1)
MUS3110 Music History I (3)
MUS3120 Music History II (3)
MUS3040 Orchestration and Form (3)
MUS3800 Internship in Sound and Lighting (1)
Applied Ensembles Principal Instrument Instrumental (At least 5 cr in Concert/Marching Band or Philharmonia, at least 3 cr in Brass Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, or other small instrumental ensemble.) (16)
(8)
MUS2360 Class Voice (1)
MUS2370 Class Strings (1)
MUS2380 Class Woodwinds (1)
MUS2390 Class Brass (1)
MUS2400 Class Percussion (1)
MUS3730 Conducting (3)
MUS3731 Fieldwork Component (1)
MUS3760 Pedagogy of Music K-6 (3)
MUS3761 Fieldwork Component (1)
MUS3780 Pedagogy of Music 6-12 (3)
MUS3781 Fieldwork Component (1)
MUS4737 Instrumental Teaching Methods (3)

Total Basic Musicianship and Performance – 72 Credits

Professional Education

Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
EDU2100 21st Century Schools I (2)
EDU3100 Introduction to Technology, Planning, and Assessment (4)
EDU3700 Literacy in the Content Area (2)
EDU4000 21st Century Schools II (2)
EDU4930 Student Teaching Seminar (2)
EDU4950 Student Teaching K-12 Programs (5)
EDU4960 Student Teaching K-12 Programs (5)
PSY3200 Educational Psychology (4)
SPE2900 Diverse Populations (3)
SPE2901 Field Component for Diverse Populations (1)

Total Professional Education – 30 Credits

Music education majors (instrumental) follow the same general education requirements as those pursuing the B.A. or B. S. degrees with the exception that the fine arts general education requirement (4 credits) is met through ensemble participation required in the major and those choosing the B.A. general education requirements may have 4 credit hours of the 2000 level requirement met through a 2000 level music course or courses required in the major.

For general education requirements please refer to the section in the Catalog online entitled General Education Requirements.

Part II: Course Descriptions

MUS 1010 Music Theory (2)
This course covers the fundamentals of music, including elements of pitch and rhythm, introduction to triads and seventh chords, diatonic chords in major and minor keys, construction and function of scale and intervals, principles of voice leading, harmonic progression, triads in first inversion, and musical form. Satisfies Fine Arts General Education requirement; theoretical-lecture credit.

MUS 1020 Music Theory (2)
This course covers triads in second inversion, use of non-harmonic tones, triads, and dominant seventh chords in root position and inversions, modulation, correlated analysis, secondary dominants, basic principles of musical form, and part writing. Satisfies Fine Arts General Education requirement; theoretical-lecture credit. Prerequisite: MUS 101.

MUS 1030 Sight Singing and Dictation (Level 1) (1)
This course develops the sight singing ability of the student through utilizing solfeggio syllables to sing melodic passages in all major keys in simple and compound meters. The aural skills emphasized include the identification of all diatonic intervals by sight and sound, melodic dictation in major keys, and chordal recognition of the tonic, subdominant, and dominant chords. This course will assist the student in developing skills related to music theory. The class will focus on interval recognition, sight singing, melodic dictation, rhythmic dictation, basic chordal recognition, and computer-based music learning skills.

MUS 1040 Sight Singing and Dictation (Level 2) (1)
This course develops the sight singing ability of the student through utilizing solfeggio syllables to sing melodic passages in all major and minor keys in simple and compound meters. The aural skills emphasized include the identification of all diatonic intervals, melodic dictation in minor and major keys, two-part harmonic dictation, and chordal identification of the basic chords in major and minor keys. The class will focus on interval recognition, sight singing, melodic dictation, rhythmic dictation, basic chordal recognition, and computer-based music learning skills.

MUS 1150 Piano Proficiency – Level I (1)
The course includes sight reading, clapping simple rhythmic patterns, folk tunes with block accompaniment, construction of major scales, recognition and explanation of time and major key signatures, and simple I-V-I progressions in major keys, including improvisation of the I-IV-I progression in all twelve keys and improvisation of simple melodies using this progression. Meets one hour weekly. For music and music education majors only.

Each Piano Proficiency student receiving the CO grade is given one full semester to complete course requirements and a letter grade is assigned at the end of the semester. If the student does not complete course requirements, he or she is assigned a D or F. All music majors must complete Piano Proficiency requirements by the end of the junior year. Students who do not finish are required to petition the music faculty to continue Piano Proficiency during the senior year. Those without extenuating circumstances are required to finish Piano Proficiency in summer school prior to the senior year.

MUS 1160 Piano Proficiency – Level II (1)
The course includes sight reading and clapping more complicated rhythmic patterns, folk tunes with broken chord accompaniments, minor key signatures, construction of major and minor triads, simple I-IV-V-I, major and minor triads, solid and broken, including improvisation of the I-IV-I-V7-I in all keys and improvisation of simple melodies using this progression. Meets one hour weekly. For music and music education majors only. See course description for MUS 115 for grading information.

MUS 2010 Advanced Music Theory (2)
This course provides advanced study of harmony and musical form within the diatonic major and minor system. Course content is divided into two parts: part one includes the diatonic seventh chords in root position and inversions, while part two includes the study of chromaticism, secondary functions, modulation, and examination of the following forms: binary, ternary, sonata, rondo, and additional derivatives of binary and ternary forms. Prerequisite: MUS 101, 102.

MUS 2020 Advanced Music Theory (2)
This course provides advanced study of harmony and musical form within the diatonic major and minor system, continuing where MUS 201 left off. Course content includes chromaticism, with an emphasis on mode mixtures, the Neopolitan chords, augmented sixth chords, inharmonic modulation; and a study of the late romanticism and 20th century techniques. Special emphasis is placed on composing at the computer, using 20th century techniques such as modal composition, those of impressionism, and “pop” chord symbols. Prerequisite: MUS 101, 102, 201.

MUS 2030 Advanced Sight-Singing and Dictation (Level 3) (1)
This course develops the sight singing ability of the student through the use of solfeggio syllables in singing melodic passages in major and minor keys with scalar variants, modulation to closely related keys, and complex rhythms. The aural skills emphasized include the identification of all diatonic intervals, melodic dictation in minor and major keys with scalar variants, three-part harmonic dictation, and chordal identification and utilization of seventh chords and augmented chords. The class will focus on interval recognition, sight singing, melodic dictation, rhythmic dictation, basic chordal recognition, and computer-based music learning skills.

MUS 2040 Sight Singing and Dictation (Level 4) (1)
This course develops the sight singing ability of the student by using solfeggio syllables to sing melodic passages in major and minor keys with scalar variants, modulation to closely and non-related keys, and complex rhythms. The aural skills emphasized include the identification of all diatonic intervals, melodic dictation with modulation to related keys, four-part harmonic dictation, and chordal identification and utilization of seventh chords, augmented chords, and secondary dominant chords.

MUS 2090 Music Literature (2)
This course is designed to give students a general understanding of stylistic periods of Western art music and representative composers. Through the study of this course, the student will develop an understanding of the materials of western art music including melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic tradition; the student will develop an understanding of the basic forms of the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20th Century periods, showing recognition from both score and recordings. The student will also develop facility in reading orchestral scores; the student will develop an introductory understanding of ethnomusicology, including the music of other cultures. Much outside listening is required and students are expected to pass an exit listening exam to pass the course. Music Literature is required of music and music education majors during the sophomore year. Prerequisites: MUS 101, 102, 103, and 115; ENCS 101 and 102. Non-music majors may be permitted to take the course with permission of the instructor.

MUS 2150 Piano Proficiency – Level III (1)
This includes sight reading, two rhythmically independent lines (three parts, two staves), harmonization of melodies with solid chords, transposition of simple melodies, scale playing, embellishments of folk tunes, improvising chords for a given melody, and improvising melodies for given chords. Meets one hour weekly. For music and music education majors only. See course description for MUS 115 for grading information.

MUS 2160 Piano Proficiency – Level IV (1)
This includes sight reading, simple hymns, free accompaniments for melodies with I-IV-V-I, transposition of folk tunes, systematic playing of all major and minor (three forms) scales (two octaves, two hands), major and minor triads, solid and broken, improvisation of simple melodic and chordal structures, improvisation using scales and chord tones to improvise over given chord progressions as well as basic standard chord progressions. Meets one hour weekly. For music and music education majors only. See course description for MUS 115 for grading information.

MUS 3110 Music History I (3)
This is a survey of Western music from classical Greece through early Christian chant, medieval monophony, early polyphony, Ars Nova and the Renaissance. Reading assignments are supplemented by audio and video tapes in the library. The class meets three times a week and is open to all students. Music and music education majors are expected to pass an exit exam to pass the course. Prerequisites: MUS 201, 202, and 209.

MUS 3120 Music History II (3)
This is a survey of Western music from the early Baroque through eighteenth century classicism, nineteenth century romanticism and the major currents of the twentieth century. Reading assignments are supplemented by audio and videotapes in the library. The class meets three times a week and is open to all students. Music and music education majors are expected to pass an exit exam to pass the course. May be taken independently of MUS 311. Prerequisites: MUS 201, 202, and 209.

MUS 3040 Orchestration and Form (3)
This is a study of orchestral and band instruments with assignments in writing and scoring for individual instruments, sections and full ensembles. Form is studied both as basic principles (part-forms, rondo, fugue, variations, sonata-allegro) and in relation to motivic and interthematic unities in selected compositions. Prerequisite: MUS 201.

Applied Music

The general aim of instruction in applied music is development in all phases of technique, style, musicianship, interpretation and repertoire. Credit for applied study is given on the following basis:

One, half-hour lesson per week (one hour of daily practice) elected for: (a) no credit or grade, or (b) one hour credit. One, one-hour lesson per week elected for: (a) no credit or grade (one to two hours of daily practice), (b) one-hour credit (one to two hours of daily practice), or (c) two-hour credit (two hours of daily practice). Music and music education majors are required to take one-hour credit (one hour lesson or two half-hour lessons weekly) for a grade, and are evaluated for proficiency levels by the joint music faculty at the end of each semester. Music and music education majors are also required to attend and perform in weekly repertoire classes as part of their applied study.

Music Education Courses

MUS 2360 Class Voice (1)
This course is a study of the basic principles of vocal production and the developing voice from young singers through adult. Students are acquainted with a variety of solo literature and work to develop acceptable tone production and diction skills. For music majors, music education majors, and theatre majors.

MUS 2370 Class Strings (1)
Class instruction focuses on the playing of orchestral string instruments: violin, viola, cello, and double bass. Class includes performance, pedagogy and literature for teaching at the elementary level.

MUS 2380 Class Woodwinds (1)
Class instruction focuses on the playing of orchestral woodwind instruments. Class includes performance, pedagogy and literature for teaching at the elementary level.

MUS 2390 Class Brass (1)
Class instruction focuses on the playing of orchestral brass instruments. Class includes performance, pedagogy and literature for teaching at the elementary level.

MUS 2400 Class Percussion (1)
Class instruction focuses on the playing of orchestral percussion instruments. Class includes performance, pedagogy and literature for teaching at the elementary level.

MUS 3730 Conducting (2)
This course covers techniques of conducting both with and without the baton, work with instrumental and choral ensembles, requirements of school, community, church; score reading, transposition and orchestration for middle/high school choral, band, and orchestral programs; rehearsal procedures, fundamentals of choral and orchestral interpretation, program building and opportunities to conduct various college ensembles as well as middle and high school ensembles. Videotaping is used for evaluation. The class meets two times a week and is open to all students.

MUS 3731 Fieldwork Component (1)
Required for all students seeking teacher licensure in music education. Co-requisite: Must be taken in conjunction with MUS 303; cannot be taken in a separate semester.

Early fieldwork is a series of involved experiences sequentially planned to allow developmental opportunities for prospective teachers in actual classroom situations. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation for assignments.

MUS 3760 Pedagogy of Music (K-6) (2)
This course deals with music in relation to the diverse needs of children; study of the child voice; creative expression, discriminating listening, rhythmic activity, dramatic play; reading readiness leading to sight-singing; and correlation with other curricular plans. Classroom management and consultation skills are also examined. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

MUS 3761 Fieldwork Component (1)
Required for all students seeking teacher licensure in music. For course description, see MUS 303.1. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Co-requisite: Must be taken in conjunction with MUS 306; cannot be taken in a separate semester.

MUS 3780 Pedagogy of Music (6-12) (2)
This course focuses on materials and methods for teaching music in middle grades/secondary settings and addresses the adolescent voice and its care; testing and classification of voices; organization of choruses, glee clubs, bands, instrumental classes; appreciation and general music classes; materials for teaching the music of other cultures; arranging, editing, and improvising choral and instrumental music in a variety of styles for middle and high school settings; composing through the use of electronic techniques (MIDI); working with special learners; public performances and the school assembly. Lesson design, classroom management, professional organizations and current trends in teaching middle grades/secondary classrooms are also examined. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

MUS 3781 Fieldwork Component (1)
Required for all students seeking teacher licensure. For course description, see MUS 303.1. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Co-requisite: Must be taken in conjunction with MUS 308; cannot be taken in a separate semester.

MUS 4737 Instrumental Teaching Methods I (2)
This course includes the theory and practice of instrumental teaching, lectures and reference work, and examination of criticism of teaching material. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.